Mamak Mee Goreng (Yellow Fried Noodles)

This is a Malaysian favourite and it’s pure sin on a plate as it’s full of carbs, oil and would easily total up to 700 calories per serving. If you are too concerned about the dial on the weighing scale, then don’t even bother trying this.

The term “mamak” is referred to the Indian Muslim clan that created this dish. “Mamak” can be a derogatory term if used in that manner but somehow when you say “mamak” and “mee goreng” it is completely acceptable. The indian muslims in Malaysia are exceptional entrepreneurs. If you had been to Malaysia, you’ll know why. There’s a “mamak” restaurant or stall almost in every part of Malaysia. It’s the biggest food chain business and soon you know it, it’ll be heavily franchised too. One of my fav mamak shop called Ali Maju can be found in most township and is running 24/7 and even at 3am, their business is running well with the shop swamped with customers. And the guy making the mee goreng is constantly at his station, frying up plates and plates of mee goreng all night long…

Now that you know how famous this plate of noodles is, maybe you’d like to try it. The original mamak mee you get from the stalls is just plain noodles with fried prawn tofu, sawi and egg. My version of course has the goodies – prawns and fishballs or fishcakes (whichever that is in the fridge).

Ingredients:

  • 1 packet of yellow noodles (If you are buying this in a chain store, it would say Singapore noodles)
  • 2 cloves of garlic sliced thin
  • 6~8 prawns, shells removed and deveined
  • 4~6 fishballs sliced to 3 (that’s 2 hemisphere and 1 flat circle)
  • 4 stalks of sawi cut into 3in lengths (If you can’t get sawi, you can use Kailan or choy sum)
  • 2 eggs
  • 4~6 small sized pre-fried tofu sliced to halves or threes (you can alternatively deep fry regular tofu if you can’t prefried tofu. It’s just a lot of work and oil required. I would recommend buying this ready made from the asian shop)
  • 2 tbsp of sambal chili with prawn (This is the most important ingredient. If you can’t find this, you might not get the similar taste. Use ground chili instead)

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  • Dark soy sauce for colour
  • Salt to taste

Method:

  1. Fry the garlic in a wok with some oil before adding the prawns and fishballs
  2. Add the sambal chili with prawn and fry some more
  3. Once the prawns and fishballs are cooked, add the noodles and top it with the dark soy sauce
  4. Using your mad skills, stir in the noodles in the wok like a pro till the noodles is covered with all the sambal and dark soy sauce. The noodles takes about 5~10mins to cook. You can add in your salt now or wait after step #5 to salt
  5. Once noodles is cooked, beat 2 eggs in a bowl. Make some space in the centre of the wok and pour in the egg mixture. Give it some 10 seconds before stirring the noodles with the egg. The idea is to coat all the noodles with egg.
  6. Once egg is cooked, add in the tofu and sawi. Give it another minute for the sawi to get some heat. Don’t forget to check for seasoning one last time. And then you are done. Get ready with the fork to dig in! Yummm…

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Flat Rice Noodles in Egg Gravy (Char Hor Fun or Kong Fu Char)

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My buddies Hana and Su will attest to how madly in love I am over this dish. I’d at least order this in a restaurant for lunch at least once a week. Sometimes I have it 2 days in a row. I never got tired of it. And probably never ever will. How could I?? The eggy gravy is the most lustrous liquid that slides through the tip of the tongue and bursts into million explosions on my taste buds.

Anyway, that was when I was still back in Malaysia. Since then, it has been a little bit of a challenge finding my char hor fun here in Western Australia. Although there are a few decent Chinese/Malaysian restaurants around but the few that I tried didn’t succeed in pleasuring my taste buds. So here I am, with my wok and chopsticks…ready to plate up another one of my favourite dishes. Bring it on!

 Ingredients:

  •  1 packet of flat rice noodles or fresh hor fun
  • 12~15 prawns shells removed and deveined (you can leave the tail tip on)
  • 12~15 rings of squids
  • 4~5 fish cakes thinly sliced
  • 8~10 4cm chicken slices (If you like pork or beef, feel free to replace with your meat of choice. My husband says hor fun is not hor fun without pork *rolls eyes*)
  • 1 whole of garlic finely chopped (You can use just half actually…but I love garlic so much!)
  • 4 stalks of choy sum (or sawi) cut to 4cm lengths
  • ½ a carrot sliced thin (1cm thickness)
  • 1 cup of cabbage (no bigger than a 2x2cm squares)
  • 2~3 tbsp of corn flour (diluted in very little water)
  • 3 tbsp stir fry sauce or oyster sauce
  • 3 tbsp fish oil
  • 3 tbsp thick soy sauce
  • Soy sauce for taste
  • Ground white pepper for taste
  • 3 eggs

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My sauces…

Method:

  1. First, to prepare the noodles, rinse the noodles in water. If the noodles appear to be clung together, it’s a good idea to use boiling water to separate them. Do not try to break it up yourself as it will break into crumbly pieces.
  2. Use 1 clove of chopped garlic to flavour some oil on the pan. Stir fry the noodles in the oil with thick soy sauce and salty soy sauce. Once noodles is cooked, keep aside Image
  3. On a different wok, heat some oil and stir fry the balance of the chopped garlic, meat, prawns, squids and fish cake. Once the seafood is cooked, add in the carrots cabbage and add 3 (medium sized) bowls of water.
  4. Add the stir fry or oyster sauce and fish oil into this gravy till the vegetables are nicely cooked. Add the the choy sum and cook a for another minute
  5. Stir in the diluted corn flour to thicken the gravy. You only need the gravy to be slightly thickened. Add salt and white pepper for taste
  6. Break in 3 eggs into the gravy and stirring the gravy as you added the eggs. Turn off the flame immediately and now the gravy will be a thick eggy liquid
  7. Plate the earlier prepared noodles on a deep set plate and top it with generous ladleful of egg gravy like in the first picture. If you like extra spice, serve with chopped chilies (chili padi) in soy sauce.